Monday, April 17, 2017

DevSecOps at Red Hat Summit 2017

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We’re starting to hear “DevSecOps" mentioned a lot. The term causes some DevOps purists to roll their eyes and insist that security has always been part of DevOps. If you press hard enough, they may even pull out a well-thumbed copy of The Phoenix Project by Gene Kim et al. [1] and point to the many passages which discuss making security part of the process from the beginning rather than a big barrier at the end.

But the reality is that security is often something apart from DevOps even today. Even if DevOps should include continuously integrating and automating security at scale. It’s at least in part because security and compliance operated largely in their own world historically. At a DevOpsDays event last year, one senior security professional even told me that this was the first IT event that was not security-specific that he had ever attended.

With that context, I’d like to point you to a session that my colleague William Henry and I will be giving at Red Hat Summit on May 3. In DevSecOps the open source way we’ll discuss how the IT environment has changed across both development and operations. Think characteristics and technologies like microservices, component reuse, automation, pervasive access, immutability, flexible deploys, rapid tech churn, software-defined everything, a much faster pace, and containers.

Risk has to be managed across all of these. (Which is also a change. Historically, we tended to talk in terms of eliminating risk while today it’s more about managing risk in a business context.)

Doing so requires securing the software assets that get built and well as the machinery doing the building. It requires securing the development process from the source code through the rest of the software supply chain. It requires securing deployments and ongoing operations continuously and not just at a point in time. And it requires securing both the application and the container platform APIs.

We hope to see you at our talk. But whether or not you can make it to see us specifically, we hope that you can make it to Red Hat Summit in Boston from May 2-4. I’m also going to put in a plug for the OpenShift Commons Gathering on the day before (Monday, May 1).

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[1] If you’re reading this, you’ve almost certainly heard of The Phoenix Project. But, if not, it’s a fable of sorts about making IT more flexible, effective, and agile. It’s widely cited as one of the source texts for the DevOps movement.

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